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Tuesday, March 8, 2016

THE REALITY OF A KNIFE FIGHT: KNIFE COMBAT

A knife fight isn't a duel, it is a violent physical confrontation between two or more combatants in which one or more participants is armed with a knife. Knife combat is one of the most scary and brutal things that anyone should ever have to encounter.  It is a close quarter Combative situation and matter of life or death.

This was written in order to inform the reader of the basics and fundamentals of using a knife in a combative situation. The overall theme of this article is to survive above all else.

Whenever you make the decision to engage another person in edged weapon combat, with the exception of Military combat; there are and will be legal ramifications. Remember it is always suggested to escape over anything else, but survival is paramount.

Choose principle over technique. Remember there is no such thing as a technique that works 100 percent of the time. When engaged in edged weapon combat it is important to target parts of the enemy's body that increase the efficiency of your attack. Example: The body is not the most efficient target, because there is a lot of muscle and other for armor, as well as bone and rib cage. Clothing often covers this area as does body armor.

It is possible for the knife to become wedged in the bones of the chest or ribs. Also there are many targets in the torso that just are not fatal. When choosing targets stick to, tendons, ligaments, veins and arteries. These are the targets that affect the function of the body. Remember this for targets, "If a man can't see, he can't fight. If a man can't breathe he can't fight. If a man can't stand he can't fight. Tendons and ligaments affect mobility. Veins and arteries affect blood loss and large quantities of blood loss affect the enemy's ability to do anything. The eyes are also excellent targets.

Learn the imperatives. The imperatives are simply 5 basic and fundamental principles that should always be adhered to in an engagement with an edged weapon. The five principles are as follows:

1.       Expect to get cut.
2.       Attack the weapon hand. Disarm the attacker.
3.       Control
4.       Time is of the essence.
5.       Survival. Survival is the most important imperative.

Your stance is the foundation of which you are able to maneuver and engage. The forward fighting stance is a great stance for maneuvering. The weight should be more even between feet. The weight should be rested on the balls of the foot. The front knee is slightly bent and the elbows are in at the sides and the hands are up for protection.

The lead hand or "checking hand” is always in front. The checking hand is the hand that assists the cutting hand in combat by controlling the enemy's weapon hand, and or setting up an attack. The chin is tucked in as to protect the throat. When in a fighting stance engaging a knife it is important to keep the inner parts of the arms and legs from being exposed to slashing by your attacker.  Remember that this stance is a mobile stance. In knife combat mobility is important. Never pass up the opportunity for escape!

Entering is nothing more than closing the distance between you and the weapon or you and the enemy. Stepping in is key in entering. The main point of entering is to close the distance and terminate the engagement quickly, not to narrowly evade and then re counter. Therefore stepping deeply and directly in is imperative. Remember, that the knife is simply an extension of the empty hand.

Clear the weapon arm In this method we will utilize covering versus blocking. The term blocking often refers to deflection by pushing away. That is why we will not use the term block, but cover. Covering in this case the higher and lower gate is executed by taking the checking hand and covering across your upper gate with your palm facing out. The checking hand moves across the body in an arching motion and stops past the ear of the non checking side.

The knife hand covers the lower gate, in an arching motion across the legs and groin. Once the lower gate hand reaches the opposite hip it continues the circle upwards till it is directly in front of your face. The act of stepping in and simultaneously covering is essential in setting your enemy up for the next technique in the series.

Now that you have successfully closed the distance and covered, you can now focus on ATTACKING THE WEAPON HAND.  Stepping and covering is a very important part of attacking the weapon hand, but you must also know how to control the weapon and how to attack the weapon hand / arm in order to make the attacker release the weapon.

Where to attack the weapon arm: Joints (Tendons and Ligaments) I.E. Above the elbow and the wrist. If the attacker cannot physically hold the weapon; or utilize his arm because his tendons and ligaments have been slashed and render his weapon arm useless, he cannot do much to cause harm with the weapon.
Veins and arteries; If you begin to slash into his veins and arteries located on the inner portion of his arm, he will begin to lose large amounts of blood. Losing large quantities of blood is demoralizing as well as it can make one pass out quickly and move them one step closer to expiration. The brachial artery on the inside of the Biceps and the axillary artery in the armpit are excellent targets to cause rapid blood loss and death.

Just because you have attacked the weapon hand and disarmed the attacker  and are in control does not mean you are home safe. You must maintain control. Remember this attacker had a knife! If he had a knife that means he is bent on killing you. You must neutralize the situation by preventing him from any other further attacks. If you control the head the body will follow. In order to keep control you must be deep inside the grappling zone. Once you gain control of the attackers head by thrusting your blade into the hollow cavity below the jaw, take him to the ground. Do not lose control of the arm!

Following through means to maintain control and neutralize the situation. Whenever given the opportunity, it is recommended to escape, however there are some situations here that may not be possible. For instruction sake we will cover finishing the enemy. This technique may be useful for soldiers in combat. For example a detainee or prisoner of war who may have to engage the enemy in order for Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape. The soldier has just engaged an enemy sentry and can not allow him to survive.

In a street encounter it is important to mention that this guy just intended on killing you with a knife, and he may have friends nearby waiting to attack you. You may be able to justify this next course of action legally if you are convincing that you were in fear of your life and there was a possibility of further danger after neutralizing the first attacker.

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