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Sunday, December 2, 2007

NINJUTSU GOKUI HIDENSHO



NINJUTSU GOKUI HIDENSYO The Book of Secrets for modern Ninjutsu Here is a very rare book which is written about how to master the secret of Ninjutsu by Mr.Ito Gingetsu who learned koga ryu from a Koag ryu Jonin.

NINDO (The way of NIN)

Modern work methods of Ninjutsu and its actual use.

How to practice of ancient Ninja

Ascetic training for no color

Ascetic training for no shape

Ascetic training for no imprint

Ascetic training for no sounds

Ascetic training for no breath

Ascetic training for no smell

The way to vanish by the trees

The way to vanish by the fire

The way to vanish by the earth

The way to vanish by the metal

The way to vanish by the water...etc

Originally it was printed in 1937. This book is facsimile editions in 1991 by Sojin-sya. Slipcase has a little natural damege as tanning stains of across the ages. The book is a excellent condition. like a brand new. All Kanji in this book has Hiragana which makes it easy to read.

Saturday, December 1, 2007

Fujita Seiko


LAST NINJA STANDING

One of the most intriguing persons in the more recent history of Japanese martial arts, Seiko Fujita (1898 – 4 January 1966), born Isamu Fujita, was a Japanese martial artist who was the 14th Headmaster or Soke of Kōga-ryū Ninjutsu and was the last of the living ninja to have served in assignments for the Japanese Imperial Government during the Taisho and Showa eras.

Fujita studied several other martial arts and was also noted as an author, researcher and collector of ancient scrolls. He was a respected martial artist and counted among his friends many of the martial arts luminaries of his day. Among them were Mabuni Kenwa, founder of Shito-Ryu Karate-Do; Taira Shinken, founder of Ryukyu Kobudo Honzon Shinko Kai; and Konishi Yasuhiro, founder of the Shindo Shizen Ryu and a Nanban Sato Ryu Kenpo student of Fujita's.

The circle also included many other Okinawan masters, including Funakoshi Gichin, founder of Shotokan Karate-Do. Those connected to the modern Okinawan arts are eager to associate their martial arts lineages with him. For example, the modern lineage chart of Ryukyu Kobudo places Fujita among the martial arts icons, Taira, Mabuni and Funakoshi. The lineage chart mentions him as "Fujita Seiko (Ninja)."

Seiko’s father, worked as a detective at the Metropolitan Police Department Investigation. In his career he was credited for catching eight condemned criminals and 25 other criminals who were sentenced to imprisonment for life. Detective Fujita was highly effective and was a person whom people talked about, “Detective Fujita is scarier than demons, and monsters.”

Shintasaemon, Fujita’s grandfather, was the 13th generation of Koga-Ryu Ninja. Fujita had learned Ninjutsu techniques such as Hokojutsu (walking techniques) and Choyaku-Jutsu (jumping techniques) from his grandfather from the age  three or four.  An ancestor in the family had worked for the Shogun as a secret agent.

When Seiko was six years old, his father worked at a police substation in Oume, [Tokyo].   His brother got beaten up and came back home bleeding.  Fujita pulled out a katana which was hanging on the wall in a room and went looking for revenge.

He went after the boys who beat up his brother with a katana (sword). The boys were screaming and running away when neighbors rushed in after hearing the kids screaming and knocked his sword down and caught him.  Fujita had hurt 11 people in total. The incident was not made public because Seiko was six years. However, his father shaved Seiko’s head to show his apologies to public and sent him to a temple in Itsuka-shi.

If Fujita were an ordinary child, he would have been quiet after the incident, however, he was back to being mischievous within a few months. While the chief priest of the Buddhist temple was away, Fujita invited some friends into the main building of the temple and rang the temple bell. They took the statue of the Buddha down. Seiko would put wax on a hallway floor which the monks would slip over. At another time, Seiko surprised those monks by making fireworks. After a year of giving the monks a great deal of trouble and grief, he was sent back home.

 After returning home from the temple, Fujita officially began training in Kōga-ryū Ninjutsu with his grandfather Fujita Shintazaemon, 13th Soke of the Kōga-ryū. Although his grandfather was soft on Fujita usually, he was very strict about teaching Ninjutsu. Fujita often got injured during practice, however, he continued practicing Ninjutsu by bracing himself up for a fight. Before the age of thirteen when he lost his grandfather in fall, his grandfather had taught him the basis of Koga ryu.

Fujita continued to get into trouble and surprised other people by fighting with Yakuza and such antics as jumping from a second floor at school. After graduating from Soujitsu in 1914, he enrolled in Waseda University, Tokyo University and Meiji University. However, he was kicked out from these universities due to his violent behavior. He finally earned a degree in religions from Nippon University in 1919 and worked as a journalist in newspaper publishing companies.. Afterwards he would start a career as a professional Ninja.

 BODY GUARD FOR THE PRIME MINISTER

Fujita was sent to guard Katsunosuke Inoue who was Japan's prime minister at the time. Mr. Inoue's family has an illustrious history in Japan. Katsunosuke’s grandfather, Kaoru Inoue was a Koshaku (Prince). The Inoue family also illicited Fujita’s services as a martial arts instructor for Mokokatsu Inoue the grandson of Katsunosuke. At the age of ten the young Inoue was gradually instructed in both ninjitsu and ju-jitsu by Fujita.

Fujita’s style stressed combat in opposition to the schools that stressed spiritual ideals. He thought the movements of Karate were too linear and the movements in Aikido too circular his style resembled an aggressive form of Aiki with a lot of open-hand techniques striking only the primary or vital area targets on the body. He also taught that throws were always preceded by hand or foot attacks.

Fujita was also expert with weapons but his repertoire was limited to those pertaining to Ninjutsu. The young Inoue was instructed daily in Shuriken Jutsu (iron darts) of the Shingetsu Ryu - In this school of Shuriken they use knives and short arrows as well as the star shaped Shaken.

However, Fujita realized that ninjutsu was of itself not a combat system and he directed Inoue to a series of teachers with the aim of developing his combat skills. Master Inoue was introduced to and taught by some of the greatest figures in martial arts history Ueshiba, Konishi, Taira, and Shioda, as well as Fujita himself.

 INSTRUCTOR AT NAKANO

Japan's Meiji, Taisho and Showa military activities which brought Japan into military contact with Russia, China and the allied forces in WWII, allowed Japan to make good use of modern ninja-espionage agents- and saw the last of the traditional ninja. The Japanese tradition of shadow warfare reemerged through the Nakano Spy School, a military intelligence academy whose graduates operated one of the most extensive spy networks during World War II.

The Nakano school was the primary training center for military intelligence operations by the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. The Imperial Japanese Army had always placed a high priority on the use of unconventional warfare.

The School trained men in espionage, and guerilla warfare. Working in the shadows, these dedicated warriors executed a range of missions, from gathering intelligence in Latin America to leading commando raids against American lines in Papua New Guinea, in the Philippines, and on Okinawa.

In 1938 there was a resurgence of interest in the ninja in Japan, also that same year the Kouhou Kinmuyouin Yosei Shisetsu or "Supporting Services Training Center" was established. One year later it was reorganized and renamed the Nakano School .

Nakano had over 2500 graduates, who were trained in a variety of subject matters related to counterintelligence, military intelligence, covert operations, sabotage, and  foreign languages along with unconventional military techniques in general, such as guerrilla warfare. Extended courses were provided on a wide variety of topics including philosophy, history, current events, martial arts, propaganda, and various facets of covert action.

Seiko Fujita replaced Uyeshiba Morihei, as the Martial Arts instructor teaching Ninjutsu and Nanban Satto ryu Kenpo at the Nakano Japanese Imperial Military Intelligence School. (Fujita's style combat was well suited for the Japanese Army's special operations and guerrilla warfare.) Texts of Fujita’s Kenpo (“Kenpo Gokui Atemi Sakkatsuho Meikai” & “Kenpo Gokui Sakkatsuho Zukai” – “Illustrated Secret Kenpo Killing Strikes”) show that it indeed was a method for fighting and killing an opponent, using ancient methods and modern methods for attacking anatomically sensitive areas.

MISSION: BURMA

Fujita led commandoes into the Burmese jungle, their mission was to go behind the enemy's positions kill as many soldiers as possible, as quietly as possible, and to sabotage and prepare for an invasion without revealing their existence. Fujita and his elite unit stealthily avoided combat and eliminated the stragglers as they wandered through the jungle. The dangers of this perilous mission were not limited to guerrilla warfare, and quietly eliminating the enemy, but there were the wilds of the Burmese jungle, poisonous snakes and spiders and disease also threatened the mission. He and the few like him had no glamour, were hated, feared and despised by the allies. They would, no doubt, have been eliminated had they faced troops head on. In the end only 14 members of this Shadow warrior unit survived.

After the war, Fujita worked as a government security specialist, and continued teaching.: Besides instructing at the Training Facilities for Secret Soldiers of the Japanese Army AKA Nakano Gakkô or Nakano Spy school, He taught at the following govt institutes:  Tôyama Academy of the Japanese Army, Military Officers Akademy (Rikugun Shikan Gakkô), Educational Facilities of the Japanese Navy (exististed from 1888-1945), Bujutsu instructor at the Headquarters of the Regiment of Military Policemen in Tôkyô.

FUJITA SEIKO’S SECRET KENPO KILLING STRIKES

Fujita was also the heir of Nanban Sattô-ryû Kenpô which consisted of Kenpo, Jujutsu, Kenjutsu, Shuriken-jutsu, Hojojutsu etc.,  as well as Taien-ryû Jôjutsu, Shingetsu-ryû Shuriken-jutsu, Ichiden-ryû Torite-jutsu.
There is a general belief that Ninja used in close quarter combat or in the close fight several dozens of external vital points or Sakkatsu that allowed him to either kill the enemy quickly and right on the spot or completely maim or disable him. This subject never ceased to attract acute attention of ninja, right on up to the man known as the last of the living ninja, who served in assignments for the Japanese Imperial Government during the Taisho and Showa eras, Fujita Seiko.

Seiko Fujita served as an instructor at the Rikugun Nakano Gakko the Japanese Imperial Military Intelligence School, teaching Ninjutsu and Nanban Satto ryu Kenpo. Fujita's style combat was well suited for the Japanese Army's special operations and guerrilla warfare training facility. Fujita’s Kenpô can be described as an unarmed/minimally armed close combat method for fighting and killing an opponent, using ancient methods and modern methods for attacking anatomically sensitive areas.

Fujita stressed combat NOT spiritual refinement or Kata, just CQB close quarter battle. A non koryu killing art that Fujita synthesized from the koryu he knew at the request of the Imperial Japanese Army during WWII.

According to his autobiography, “Doronron Saigo no Ninja”, Seiko was ordered by the Imperial Japanese Government to put his expertise to further use. He was tasked to come up with a manual or hand book for the Imperial Japanese Army on Hand to hand combat. The soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army were trained in Karate and Judo or at least the basics, however, the Japanese command felt that it just wasn’t enough and was dead set on developing on shortest terms a system of close quarter combat that could kill the enemy out or put the enemy out of commission quickly and efficiently.

Fujita’s knowledge, expertise, combat experience and the research performed in service of his Government led to the publication of “Kenpo Gokui Atemi Sakkatsuho Meikai” & “Kenpo Gokui Sakkatsu Ho Zukai” (“Illustrated Secret Kenpo Killing Strikes”) Fujita’s “Kenpo Gokui Sakkatsu Ho” may have been the closest thing to an actual though modern shinobi (ninja) assassin martial art.

“Based on the result of a long term research on the Human body this book shows the right places of the most effective vital organ parts/vital points in anatomical diagrams for the secrets of killing and reviving.
This book also shows the effective way of hitting those places. If you learn the places of vital organs points and the way of hitting them you will obtain the way of Killing/taking down enemies with one stroke/strike.

 The most effective way of hitting the anatomical weak points/ vital points hinges upon multiple factors; physical application, conditioning, awareness of targets and psychological preparedness.
The right places to strike the most effective vital points for the secrets of killing/disabling/rendering unconscious/ maiming.( If you learn the way of hitting the vital organs points you will obtain the way of taking out enemies quickly and efficiently.)”

Did Fujita Seiko pass down his Koga ryu Ninjutsu? Did he appoint someone to carry on his Koga ryu ninjutsu?

I have been asked this question several times and the simplest answer is a resounding “NO”.  He made it quite clear that he would not appoint a person to become his successor to his family’s Koga ryu Wada Ha Ninjutsu. It was his Nanban Satto ryu Kenpo that was passed on.

Fujita’s family had ties to the Koga ryu they had worked as secret agents or “ommitsu” for the shogunate. According Donn Draeger’s book  “Comprehensive Asian Fighting arts”, Fujita himself was the last of the living ninja to have served in assignments for the Japanese Imperial Government during the Taisho and Showa eras.

Fujita’s family name used to be Wada, and so the art they passed down in the family was called Koga-ryu, Wada- ha. "-Ha" means faction and a family tradition passed down by a family from Koga. Fujita Seiko made it quite clear that he DID NOT pass on his Family’s Koga ryu Wada Ha Ninjutsu. Fujita himself wrote:
“Not everybody can become a Ninja, as one would need to possess the neccesary qualities. Unfortunately, I haven’t met such a person. That’s why I am the last Ninja of Kôga-ryû.”

However his Nanban sato ryu would be passed on. Apart from being the 14th generation headmaster of Kôga-ryû Ninjutsu, Fujita was also the heir of Nanban Sattô-ryû Kenpô. Fujita’s Kenpo consisted of Nanban Satto-ryu Kenpo no Jutsu, Nanban Satto Taijutsu und Irimi, Nanban Kenpo Toshin Sakkatsu-ho and Nanban Satto Sogo Bujutsu (Kenpo, Jujutsu, Kenjutsu, Shuriken-jutsu, Hojojutsu etc.)

During World War II Fujita conducted training in Nanban Sattô-ryû Kenpô at the Army Academy of Nakano (Rikugun Nakano Gakkô). According to his autobiography, toward the end of World War II, Seiko was ordered by the Imperial Japanese Government to put his expertise to further use. He was tasked to come up with a manual or hand book for the Imperial Japanese Army on Hand to hand combat. The soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army were trained in Karate and Judo or at least the basics, however, the Japanese command felt that it just wasn’t enough and was dead set on developing on shortest terms a system of close quarter combat that could kill the enemy out or put the enemy out of commission quickly and efficiently.

Fujita’s research performed in service of his Government led to the publication of “Kenpo Gokui Atemi Sakkatsuho Meikai” & “Kenpo Gokui Sakkatsu Ho Zukai” (“Illustrated Secret Kenpo Killing Strikes”) Fujita’s “Kenpo Gokui Sakkatsu Ho”. This work can be described as an unarmed/minimally armed close combat method for fighting and killing an opponent, using ancient methods and modern methods for attacking anatomically sensitive areas. One could say that Fujita’s Kenpo may have been the closest thing to an actual though modern shinobi (ninja) assassin martial art.

After the war Fujita taught his Nanban Sattô-ryû Kenpô  to Mabuni Kenwa founder of Shito ryu Karate and Iwata Manzo.  Among Fujita’s other students were Inoue Motokatsu, Fujitani Masatoshi, the actor Wakayama Tomisaburô  and others. Iwata Manzô of Shitô-ryû became 4th generation heir of Nanban Sattô-ryû.


Nanban Satto Ryu is a system that contained Kansetsu Waza (locks) Nage Waza (throws) and Atemi Waza (pressure point attacks) that is related to Nanban Ippon Ryu. The Bugei Ryuha Daijiten (pg 662) lists the lineage as follows: 1st  Hashimoto Ippusai , 2nd Hashimoto Ippusai , 3rd Fujita Seiko (1919), 4th Iwata Manzo (1948). The Nihon Kobudo Taikai lists all of the above, plus Iwata Genzo son of Iwata Manzo (1993).



Massaki Hatsumi



Massaki Hatsumi 34th soke of Togakure ryu ninjutsu which is similar to the technigues in Gingetsu Ito's book on Koga ryu technigues "Ninjutsu No Gokui"



Koga ninja museum


Statue outside the ninja museum

Koga ryu history

Kōga-ryū (甲賀流, literally “the Kōka School” and originally pronounced Kōka-ryū) is a school of ninjutsu. It is one of the most well-known schools of ninjutsu, along with Iga-ryū. It originated from the town of Kōka, modern Kōka City in Shiga Prefecture. This school of ninjutsu specializes in the use of guerrilla warfare tactics and the use of chemicals, a vestige of which can be seen in the many pharmaceutical companies in modern Kōka City.

Koga Ryu Ninjutsu was founded by 53 families during the 10th Century, probably under the Tenkyo period (938-946). Mochizuki Saburo Kameie was given an area of land called Kogagun in virtue of his performance in the battle against Taira No Masakado. He changed his name to Koga Oni No Kami Kameie. However, it was his son Oni No Kami Iechika who studied Genjutsu under Tatsumaki Hoshi and was the founder of Koga Ryu. The families with the most important in Koga Ryu were Koga, Mochizuki, Ugai, Naikii, Akutagawa, Ueno, Ban and Nagano.

Ninjutsu No Gokui


"Ninjutsu No Gokui" (The secrets of Ninjutsu) was written by Gingetsu Ito in 1917. Gingetsu Ito learned Koga ryu techniques and history over a long period of time from Tanemura Ihachiro, a jonin in Koga Ryu. The techniques described in this book are very similar to those in the Togakure Ryu from Iga.
Gingetsu Ito would be considered another source for Koga ryu that made it to the twentieth century.

Koga ryu ninjutsu densho


The oldest text is "Ninjutsu hisho ogiden no kan" ( the secret essence of ninja technique) was originally composed by Mochizuki Shigeie in 1536. Mochizuki Shigeie was a koga ryu ninja of the Mochizuki family and was captain of koga go jusan ke ( the 53 families of koga ryu) their ancestor is Koga Saburo Kaneie who has a place of honor akeuni Shrine now in hatorri hanzos shrine. This text describes Koga ninja technique.

Donn Draeger


Donn Draeger knew Koga ryu ninja master Fujita Seiko. He authored numerous books that were some of the first few sources available in the west. One of these books was on ninjutsu entitled "Ninjutsu: The art of Invisibilty. Prior to this most martial arts texts were written in Asian languages. The books he authored became among the most reliable sources available in the English language.

Draeger served as "Martial Arts Coordinator" in the James Bond film "You Only Live Twice" where he also doubled for Sean Connery. The film's climax, and several incidents throughout the film, made exciting use of the ninja and set forever in the publics mind the image of a black garbed assassin.

He vitalized the academic field of study called hoplology when he founded the International Hoplology Society (IHS) in late 1950s. Specific stories and anecdotes about Draeger can be learned in Martial Musings a book by long time friend and co-author Robert W. Smith.

He continued his practice of the martial arts throughout his life. He studied with many Asian masters, partly as a result of being stationed in the Pacific Rim during his tenure in the Marine Corps, and partly through living in Japan for more than a decade. Draeger was a member of Nihon Kobudo Shinkokai, the oldest Japanese cultural organization for the study and preservation of classical martial arts. He was also the first non-Japanese practitioner of Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū, achieving instructor status (kyoshi menkyo) in that system. He also held high ranks in Shindo Muso-ryu jodo, in judo, and in kendo, being awarded the highest rank of Menkyo Kaiden in Shindo Muso-ryu posthumously.